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you for coming in. turkey and its nato allies are treating this attack as a deliberate one. the original mortar fire. russia obviously disagrees. what do you think? >> i cannot think this was a deliberate attack. that would be very unwise in terms of syrian policy making. i think this was an error, so to speak. we are speaking about the civil war situation. there are many people pointing their guns at each other. it is very possible that this turkish lira was not targeted, but the syrian -- that this turkish and village was not targeted, but the syrian -- that is turkish millage -- that this turkish viillage -- village was not targeted. president bashar al-assad is -- for the time being, he is not really -- he does not want to see this. the russians and the chinese would not support such a move. it is not in the syrian interest to act in a very aggressive manner. the turks are very nervous. they have seen border violations on several occasions. let's not forget that back in june, two planes were shot down by the syrians. the turks are very nervous about these developments.
of firing across the border yet. it's interesting that the secretary general of the nato military alliance of which turkey is a member, he came out and said he's happy that the turks have restrained themselves, that they have not retaliated more forcefully thus far. and he also sent the message that the syrians should be listening to saying that nato is ready and prepared to defend turkey if it continues coming under attack. this will be something important to watch. if nato gets drawn in, if turkey gets drawn in, then it could also bring in russia and countries like iran which have been very strong committed allies of the embattled syrian regime. >> syrian civil war and we'll see what happens with turkey. ivan watson respect thank you. >>> it may be the most contested wildlife permit in a decade. one aquarium wants to import beluga whales from russia. [ woman ] before allegra, i was constantly fighting indoor allergies. after allegra, i found peace. only allegra is both fast and non-drowsy, and it works on my outdoor allergies, too. after allegra, i have it all. >>> environmentalists are
and kosovo or a factor allowing nato to expand to the black sea although nobody really wrote that. .. and all we did was to transport one marine battalion from one place to another. no fighting in between. wasn't particularly dangerous but the logistics were absolutely -- gas stations, mountains of water bottles and full tents and meals ready to eat. it was an immense logistical exercise to get men and women and material from northern kuwait to fallujah without any fighting and you see how distance matters. how you just couldn't defeat distance through the latest technology. >> might be interesting for this audience if you personalize the story of iraq a little bit and talk about your own views. this is a place you traveled in with saddam hussein, you were a supporter of the war. explain why. i found some of the most wrenching passages in this book discussions about what a disaster the iraq war has proved for every party in the united states, most of all the iraqis. >> i knew iraq intimately in the 1980s as a reporter. huckabee airtran/iraq war from the iraq side. iraq was like a vast prison
other challenges. our european allies are inward looking. that limits them. nato wend outside its boundaries . in terms of our ability, it seems there has been strong headwind at the very least. we're talking about the next american president. >> we're talking about the headwind where the united states is still a player. it has to be on the sly and on the cheap. that is to say, new ways to make a difference without necessarily putting marshall plans to work in every region of the world. and i think the other way to handle the headwinds so to come back to one of the virtues, one of the strengths of the american approach to global order, and that is that it does have a capacity for various reasons, to partner and build institutions that work with other states. the contrast with china is remarkable. the u.s. has 55 or more security partners. the nature of a commitment. china has one or two. the united states has somehow founded a kind of natural way to operate through international institutions, through partnerships, client-base, all sorts of different mechanisms that can generate co
in syria, and over 100,000 refugees in our nato allied turkey, destabilization in the region and now missile or arms being fired between syria and turkey, our nato ally for whom we have obligations but the same approach resulted in iran getting much, much closer to nuclear breakout, resulted in the 20 embassies that had demonstrations. >> but what about the specific -- the specific -- >> american flag burned and the black flag of al qaeda raised and american ambassador killed. >> the specific point that collin just made if you give shoulder-fired surface-to-air missiles to some guys they could shoot down israeli aircraft? how do you prevent that? >> well, how you prevent it is not waiting until it's out of hand. you get involved earlier. you anticipate the problem. you lead. that's why you work with the opposition a year ago, not waiting until may when it's being crowded out by extremists. that's why you start to arm the moderate opposition early this year. not wait until late may before you let some of our friends do it. yes, it gets tougher when you fail to act and you know what? i
. and on this, there will be no flexibility with vladimir putin. i will call on our nato allies to keep the greatest military alliance in history strong by honoring their commitment to each devote 2% of their gdp to security spending. today, only three of the 28 nato nations meet this benchmark. i will make further reforms to foreign assistance, to create incentives for good governance, for free enterprise, and for greater trade in the middle east and beyond. i will organize all efforts in the greater middle east under one official, with responsibility and accountability to prioritize efforts and to produce results. i will rally our friends and our allies to match our generosity with their, and i will make it clear to the recipients of our aid that in return for our material support, they must meet the responsibilities of every decent, modern government, to respect the rights of all the citizens, including women and minorities, to ensure civil society, a free media, political parties, and an independent judiciary, and to abide by international commitments to protect our diplomats and o
with syria that it does this international nato support, u.s. support behind it, so that is entirely possible but turkey has a strong professional army. they are not lacking in capability. they just want to know they are going to have real depth. >> the violence within syria has been going on a long time now. are you surprised that assad is still in power? >> no. i was just in damascudamascus. he is not having any major significant defections. the center of the capital and quite a number of the suburbs around it are untouched by war and still a large percent of the population that don't support him, they are very concerned of the alternative. so, no, i think he is pretty solid right now. >> nic robertson, thanks. nice to see you here at home, at least home for us. and you too sometimes. >> it is. >> where do you live, anyway? >> i live in london, but my wife and daughters are all u.s. citizens. >> welcome, nic. have a good time here. >>> mitt romney stole the spotlight last night but will a strong debate performance be enough to win the white house? our panel weighs in next. i don't spend mon
certain problems. that limits them. on nato, they started broadening the mandate by going into afghanistan and you even have today in the paper stories that they are not happy with it and so forth. in terms of our ability to project our influence, it seems like there are some strong head winds at the very least. how'd you think that is likely to manifest itself over the course of the next year? we're talking about the next american president. is it going to be capable of combating this perception of a declining american influence? >> one thing that has happened is the next president needs to be articulate a rationale for the united states to provide leadership even under conditions where there are economic and other headwinds in front of the united states. the u.s. is still a critical player. it will have to be a view of internationalism where if you look at new ways the united states can make a difference without necessarily putting marshall plans to work in every region of the world, i think the other way to handle the head wind is to come back to one of the virtues are successes to the
. nato went outside its boundaries and started broadening its mandate by going into afghanistan. even today in the paper's story say they are leaving sooner. they are not happy with it and so forth. in terms of our ability to project the force, it seems like there are some strong head winds of the very least. john, how do you think that is likely to manifest itself over the course of the next year? we are talking about the american president. how you think he combats this or is he going to be capable combating this perception of the declining american influence? >> i think one thing that has to happen is that the next president needs to be articulate a rationale for the united states to provide leadership even under the conditions where there are economic and other head winds in front of the united states. the united states still is a critical player and will have to be a vision of internationalism that is on the sly and on the cheek that is to say new ways the united states can make a difference without necessarily putting marshall plans to work in every region of the world. and then
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)